Enviar esta Página Cerrar Ventana
 
[Cerrar]
 

Empresa Newsletters

[Atrás]  [Enviar esta Página]  [Imprimir]

      Personal qualifications (# )

 
Personal qualifications
Personal qualifications

This section covers questions on certification of airmen and other persons engaged in aviation activities.

Note that license and certificate have technical meanings. Persons receive licenses or certificates based on their demonstrated knowledge and skills. Federal Aviation Administration rules do not use the term license, but many people do and it is the most common term internationally. FAA rules always use the term "certificate."

The certification of airmen and other persons engaged in aviation related activities in all countries based on two foundations: national law and international agreements.

The Chicago Convention of 1944, the main international multilateral aviation agreement, created the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to ensure the safe and orderly development of international aviation. Under ICAO, national authorities are to ensure that persons, procedures, and equipment meet international standards. Under this system national authorities have an obligation to recognize licenses from other countries, but can often subject them to limitations.

The United States Federal Aviation Administration only issues certificates to U.S. citizens or to resident aliens unless special circumstances exist.

The exceptions to citizenship or residency requirements usually have to do with operating U.S. registered aircraft or with training received in the United States.

PILOT CERTIFICATES

FAA has an extensive library of pilot training and testing materials at Fedworld bulletin board and web site under the FAA ATT library, ftp://ftp.fedworld.gov/pub/faa-att/faa-att.htm .

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY FOR A PILOT CERTIFICATE?

The FAA only considers applications for pilot certificates from United States citizens or resident aliens. The exceptions are:

  • If you take a flight training course in the United States;
  • If you need a license to operate a U.S. registered aircraft; or
  • If you need a flight instructor certificate for training students who are citizens of the United States.

CAN I USE MY FOREIGN LICENSE TO GET A U.S. CERTIFICIATE?

YES. A holder of a pilot license issued by a country belonging to ICAO may apply for an FAA private or commercial pilot certificate authorizing him or her to act as a pilot of civil aircraft of U.S. registry. There are limitations:

  • You can be a pilot-in-command of a U.S.-registered aircraft.
  • However, you cannot act as a pilot-in-command or a crew member for compensation or hire.

WHERE CAN I APPLY FOR A U.S. PILOT LICENSE? WHAT DOCUMENTATION IS NEEDED?

Application for a U.S. pilot certificate can be made at the FAA Flight Standards International Field Offices or FAA Flight Standards District Offices.

  • You should call the District Office or the International Field Office to make an appointment and to verify the requirements and any documentation required.
    • The documentation required from an applicant usually consists of proof of identification such as a birth certificate or passport, a current medical certificate, and any aviation-related licenses or certificates.
    • Certificates are not issued through the mail.

FAA Advisory Circular, AC 61-12M (Student Pilot Guide), GPO:SN 050-007-00959-3 ($1.25 + 25%), outlines general procedures for obtaining student and private pilot certificates. This Advisory Circular can also be found on the FedWorld Bulletin Board in the FAA-ATT library and on the Internet at http://www.faa.gov/avr/afs/acs/61-12m.txt.

DO I NEED TO SPEAK AND UNDERSTAND ENGLISH?

YES. You must be able to understand, read and speak English.

  • The written and flight examinations are given in English.
  • English is the international language of aviation. Air traffic control instructions are transmitted in English, and other vital flight information is written or spoken in English.

WHAT MUST I DO IF MY TEMPORARY PILOT CERTIFICATE EXPIRES?

If your pilot certificate has not been received from the FAA Registry in Oklahoma City, contact the office where the temporary certificate was issued in order to receive an extension.

HOW CAN I RECEIVE FLIGHT TRAINING IN THE UNITED STATES?

There are three options:

  1. Flight instruction at FAA certified flight schools either under Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 61 or Part 141.
  2. Lessons from individual FAA certified instructors.
  3. Attendance at a college or university in the U.S. that offers flight training programs leading towards a commercial pilot and flight instructor certificate while giving credit towards an academic degree.

If you are interested in the regulations providing for certification of flight schools or training centers:

· 14CFR, Part 61 can be found on Internet at http://www.faa.gov/avr/AFS/FARS/far-61.txt

· 14CFR Part 141 at http://www.faa.gov/avr/AFS/FARS/far-141.txt, and

· and 14CFR Part 142 at http://www.faa.gov/avr/AFS/FARS/far-142.txt .

HOW DO I FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE FAA CERTIFIED FLIGHT SCHOOLS, INSTRUCTORS, OR COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES OFFERING FLIGHT INSTRUCTION?

Individual Instruction

Flight training is conducted by individual instructors under the provisions of FAR 61. These are not contained in a comprehensive list but can normally be located by advertisement and telephone book listings in the Yellow Pages under Airports.

Flight Schools

  • FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 140-2Y(List of Certificated Pilot Schools) lists approved flight training schools which conduct flight training under CFR Part 141. GPO: AC 140-2Y, SN 050-007-801142-3 ($2.50 + 25%)

Further information and an updated list of colleges is available in the FAA Pamphlet, "Careers in Airway Science," which is available from:

Federal Aviation Administration

Office of Higher Education of Advanced Technology Staff, AHR-16
800 Independence Avenue, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20591
Telephone: (202) 267-3690 or 7212
Fax: (202) 267-5908
Internet E-mail: andrew.robinson@faa.dot.gov

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO GET A PILOT´S CERTIFICATE IN THE UNITED STATES?

The cost of obtaining various certificates and ratings depends on a number of variables: type and complexity of aircraft used in training, instructor charges, ground school charges, medical examination fees, and aircraft rental if needed.

The amounts below represent estimates based on average charges to complete minimum prescribed requirements. Actual amounts will vary by individual, region and even time of year. These estimates do not include hourly aircraft charges to obtain required minimum flight experience. The price does not include housing and other living expenses. Aircraft rental rates vary from approximately $25 to $100 per hour of operation.

  • Private: $2,000.00
  • Instrument: $2,300.00
  • Commercial: $500.00 for 10 hours of flight instruction and ground school. (Applicant must have 250 hours total time before receiving license.)

WHERE CAN I FIND A LIST OF AIRMAN KNOWLEDGE TESTING CENTER LOCATIONS?

A list of knowledge testing center locations including those located outside the United States may be found at. ftp://ftp.fedworld.gov/pub/faa-att/tst_site

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DIFFERENT FAA PILOT CERTIFICATES?

The information provided on the requirements to obtain pilot certificates is not complete. Complete detailed information must be determined by an in-depth review of the current Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61.

Student Pilot Certificates

  • Must be at least 16 years of age and able to speak, read, and understand the English language.
  • Pass a third class medical examination prior to solo flight.
  • Glider or balloon student pilot applicants need only be 14 years of age. A medical examination is not required.

A student pilot may not act as pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers. A student pilot may not carry property for compensation or hire.

Private Pilot Certificate

  • Must be at least 17 years of age.
  • Must be able to speak, read, and understand the English language.
  • Must possess a Third Class medical certificate.
  • Must pass oral, written and flight examinations.
  • Must have a total of 40 hours of flight time including the following:
    1. At least 20 hours of flight instruction by a certified flight instructor including at least 3 hours of cross-country and 3 hours of night flying.
    2. At least 20 hours of solo flight time including at least 10 hours in type of aircraft and 10 hours of cross-country flight.
    3. At least 3 solo takeoffs and landings to a full stop at an airport with an operating tower.
      A private pilot may act as pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers but may not do so for hire. A private pilot may share operating expenses of the aircraft with his or her passengers. A private pilot may not carry property for compensation or hire.

Instrument Rated Certificate

  • Must hold at least a current Private Pilot Certificate.
  • Must be able to read, speak and understand the English language.
  • Must have at least 125 hours of total time, including
    1. 50 hours as pilot in command in cross-country flight in a powered aircraft with other than a student pilot certificate:
    2. 40 hours of simulated or actual flight in instrument conditions.
    3. 15 hours of instrument instruction in an airplane or helicopter as appropriate.
  • An applicant for instrument rating must successfully pass a written and flight test.

Commercial Certificate

  • Must be at least 18 years of age.
  • Must hold a current Private Pilot Certificate, or equivalent.
  • Must be able to speak, read, and understand the English language.
  • Must hold at least a valid Second Class medical certificate.
  • Must pass written, oral, and flight examinations.
  • Must have a total of at least 250 hours of flight time as a pilot including:
    1. 100 hours in powered aircraft including at least 50 hours in airplanes
    2. 10 hours flight instruction given by a certified flight instructor and received in complex aircraft (an aircraft having retractable landing gear, flaps, and a controllable pitch propeller).
    3. 50 hours of flight instruction given by a certified flight instructor, including:
      • 10 hours of instrument instruction of which 5 hours must be in flight in an aircraft.
      • 10 hours instruction in preparation for the commercial pilot flight test.
    4. 100 hours of pilot in command, including:
      • 50 hours in make and models of aircraft
      • 50 hours of cross country flight.
      • 5 hours of night flying including 10 takeoffs and landings as sole manipulator of the controls.

The holder of a commercial pilot certificate may act as pilot in command of an aircraft carrying persons or property for compensation or hire. A commercial pilot who does not have an instrument rating is restricted to commercial operations within 50 nautical miles (NM) of the airport and may not carry passengers for hire at night.

Airline Transport Certificate

  • Must be 23 years of age and of good moral character.
  • Must be able to read, write, understand and speak English without accent or impediment.
  • Must be a high school graduate, or equivalent.
  • Must hold a current Commercial Pilot Certificate, or equivalent.
  • Must have a First Class medical certificate issued within 6 months of the date of application.
  • Must have at least 250 hours of flight time as pilot in command of an airplane, or as copilot of an airplane performing the duties and functions of a pilot in command under the supervision of a pilot in command, at least 100 hours of which were cross country and 25 hours of which were night flight time and:
  • At least 1500 hours total flight time as pilot, including:
    1. 500 hours of cross country flight time
    2. 100 hours of night flight time, and
    3. 75 hours of actual or simulated instrument time, at least 50 hours of which were actual flight.

An airline transport pilot has the privileges of a commercial pilot with an instrument rating. An applicant for an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane rating must hold a commercial pilot certificate, or a foreign airline transport pilot or commercial pilot license, without limitations, issued by a member state of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

Additional information regarding pilot licensing may be obtained from the FAA by writing:

Federal Aviation Administration
Flight Standards Service
Certifications Branch, AFS-840
800 Independence Avenue, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20591
Phone: (202) 267-8196
Fax: (202) 267-5094

WHAT IS THE FAA RULE REGARDING AGE FOR AIR CARRIER PILOTS?

According to 14 CFR 121.383, airlines may not use the services of a pilot on an airplane engaged in commercial operations under 14 CFR 121 if that person has reached his 60th birthday. 14 CFR, Part 121 may be found on Internet at http://www.faa.gov/avr/AFS/FARS/far-121.txt.

MEDICAL CERTIFICATES

WHAT ARE THE FAA RULES REGARDING MEDICAL CERTIFICATES?

Medical certificates are issued only to United States citizens or resident aliens, except when a certificate is required for the operation of U.S. registered civil aircraft by a non-U.S. citizen.

U.S. medical certificates are issued to applicants who meet the medical standards set forth in 14 CFR Part 67, based on medical examination and evaluation of medical history and condition. 14 CFR Part 67 is sold by the GPO on an individual basis, and it can be found on the Internet at http://www.faa.gov/avr/AFS/FARS/far-67.txt.

First Class Medical Certificate

  • A first class medical certificate is required to exercise privileges of an airline transport pilot certificate.
  • The first class certificate is valid for: six calendar months for operations requiring a first class certificate; twelve months for operations requiring only a second class certificate; thirty-six months for operations requiring only a third class certificate before the pilot reaches age 40; and twenty-four months after age 40.

Second Class Medical Certificate

  • A second class medical certificate is required to exercise privileges of a commercial pilot rating.
  • The second class certificate is valid for: twelve calendar months for those operations requiring a second class certificate; thirty-six months for operations requiring only a third class certificate before the pilot reaches age 40; and twenty-four months after age 40.

Third Class Medical Certificate

  • A third class medical certificate is required to exercise private and student pilot privileges.
  • The third class medical certificate is valid for thirty-six months before the pilot reaches age 40 and twenty-four months after age 40.

A pilot may choose which type of medical certificate he or she needs depending upon the capacity in which the pilot operates the aircraft. The First or Second Class Medical Certificate has the capacity to substitute for a lower class certificate. All medical certificates expire on the last day of the month regardless of which day of the month the medical examination was actually taken.

WHERE DO I GET A MEDICAL CERTIFICATE?

A medical certificate can only be given by an FAA designated Aviation Medical Examiner (AME) after the applicant has passed a medical examination. The AME can either be a private doctor or a flight surgeon of the U.S. armed forces at a specified military posts, stations and facilities.

  • There are approximately 5,500 FAA designated AMEs located in the United States and its territories.
  • There are approximately 400 FAA designated Aviation Medical Examiners located in 84 countries worldwide.

A listing of examiners may be obtained through an overseas FAA office, U.S. Embassy, or Consulate.

You can also obtain a directory of AMEs by contacting:

Aeromedical Education Division
FAA, MMAC, CAMI, AAM-400
Post Office Box 25082
Oklahoma City, OK 73125
Phone: (405) 954-6205
Fax: (405) 954-8016

Web Page: http://www.cami.jccbi.gov

WHAT CAN I DO IF I HAVE SPECIAL MEDICAL PROBLEMS?

Depending upon the medical condition involved, the designated AME may be able to issue a certificate. If a special issuance (waiver) from the FAA is necessary, required medical data is processed through the Aeromedical Certification Division in Oklahoma City, just as for an applicant in the United States. All AMEs are provided information on the processing of requests for special issuance.

For further information about medical certification, contact:

Aeromedical Certification Division:
FAA, MMAC, CAMI, AAM-300
Post Office Box 25082
Oklahoma City, OK 73125
Phone: (405) 954-4419
Fax: (405) 954-3231

HOW CAN I BECOME A MEDIAL EXAMINER?

The Federal Air Surgeon, or his authorized representative within the FAA, may select Aviation Medical Examiners from qualified physicians who apply.

For further information, contact

Aeromedical Education Division
USDOT, FAA, AAM-400
Post Office Box 25082
Oklahoma City, OK 73125-5064
Phone: (405) 954-6205
Fax: (405) 954-8016

Web Page: http://www.cami.jccbi.gov

WHAT TYPES OF AEROMEDICAL TRAINING ARE AVAILABLE AND HOW CAN I APPLY FOR THEM?

The Aeromedical Education Division of the FAA Office of Aviation Medicine´s Civil Aeromedical Institute (CAMI) offers a variety of aeromedical training programs.

  • Basic aeromedical training is conducted at CAMI for national and international physicians who apply for designation as FAA Aviation Medical Examiners (AMEs). AMEs are physicians responsible for performing medical examinations of U.S. aeronautical personnel (pilots, air traffic controllers). Courses for experienced AMEs are held at various locations around the continental United States.
  • CAMI offers a 1-day aviation physiology course for FAA flight crews, civil aviation pilots, and FAA aviation medical examiners (AMEs). In addition to the basic academic content, this course offers practical demonstrations of rapid decompression (8 to 18K feet) and hypoxia (25K feet) in a hypobaric chamber, as well as a practical demonstration of spatial disorientation in a Vertigon or in the new General Aviation Spatial Disorientation Demonstrator (Gyro-1).
  • CAMI also offers a global survival course for general aviation pilots. This is an 8-hour introductory course that provides the basic knowledge and skills for coping with various common survival scenarios. In addition, this course teaches students how to easily assemble and use a personal survival kit.

CAMI supports international programs that promote interaction between aviation medicine professionals, enable exchange of scientific information, and promote FAA´s leading role in civil aviation medicine worldwide.

  • One such program is the International Exchange Visitor Program which allows qualified specialists from foreign aviation organizations to enter the U.S. to conduct studies and/or exchange information and expertise at FAA facilities and at a minimum cost to the agency.
  • The main objective of this program is to promote global aviation safety through international cooperation, promotion of FAA policies and procedures and of U.S. standards and equipment, and avoidance of unnecessary duplication of research and study efforts.
  • Through this program, International Exchange Visitors are able to engage in day-to-day operations at CAMI and have the opportunity to participate in all of the training activities taking place at CAMI.
  • International Exchange Visitors are solely responsible to secure financial support to cover all expenses incurred during their stay at CAMI. That individual responsibility includes, but is not limited to, salary, insurance, local transportation, travel, lodging, meals, and other personal expenses. International Exchange Visitors also must comply with all applicable security clearance requirements, immigration laws (visa), and other applicable FAA policies and regulations.

For additional information about any of the above mentioned training programs as well as aeromedical publications please contact:

Aeromedical Education Division
FAA, MMAC, CAMI, AAM-400
Post Office Box 25082
Oklahoma City, OK 73125
Phone (405) 954-6205
Fax: (405) 954-8016

Web Page: http://www.cami.jccbi.gov

OTHER AIRMAN CERTIFICATES

HOW CAN I BECOME AN FAA-CERTIFIED MECHANIC WITH AN AIRFRAME AND POWER PLANT (A&P) RATING?

  • To be eligible for a mechanic certificate and associated ratings a person must:
  • Be at least 18 years of age.
  • Read, write, speak and understand the English language.
    NOTE: An applicant employed outside the United States by a U.S. carrier may not have to meet the language requirement, however, the certificate will be endorsed: "Valid only outside the United States".
  • Must pass written and practical examinations.

Each applicant for a mechanic certificate must present either an appropriate graduation certificate or certificate of completion from a certified aviation maintenance technician school, or documentary evidence, of:

  • At least 18 months of practical experience with the procedures, practices, materials, tools, machine tools, and equipment generally used in constructing, maintaining, or altering airframes, or power plants appropriate to the rating sought; OR,
  • At least 30 months of practical experience concurrently performing the duties appropriate to both the airframe and power plant ratings.

Documentary evidence, satisfactory to the Federal Aviation Administration Administrator means: ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS, not copies, demonstrating experience and a letter from the national civil aviation authority certifying that applicant is employed as required above. Failure to present these documents, in original, will preclude administration of examinations.

  • Foreign applicants who are considering enrolling in training programs offered by institutions not listed in AC 147-2CC (Directory of FAA Certificated Aviation Maintenance Technician Schools), or in abbreviated courses given by approved schools to prepare the applicant for the requisite oral and practical tests, should make certain their documentation meets FAA requirements before traveling to the United States. The FAA Flight Standards International Field Offices or FAA Flight Standards District Offices in the United States will advise on the acceptability of any applicant´s documentation.

Airframe and Power plant Certification Information, AC 65-11B, (SN 050-007-00750-7 ($1.00 + 25%) provides useful information regarding requirements. It is available from Government Printing Office. Information on how to order publications begins on page 26.

WHERE CAN I GO TO SCHOOL TO TRAIN AS A MECHANIC FOR AN AIRFRAME AND POWER PLANT (A&P) RATING?

FAA certified aviation maintenance technical schools are listedin AC 147-2 CC (Directory of FAA Certificated Aviation Maintenance Technician Schools), SN 050-007-01125-3 ($1.25 + 25%).

There are no approved schools outside the United States.

  • Foreign applicants are permitted to take the written examination outside the United States, but must first demonstrate a need based upon place of employment and the need to work on U.S.-registered aircraft. Examinations can be taken at the nearest Flight Standards International Field Office.
  • Foreign applicants who graduate from an FAA certified school in the United States are entitled to take the written, oral and practical tests while in the United States. If the applicant passes all tests, he or she is issued a mechanic´s certificate with rating(s) as appropriate without restrictions even if he or she returns to a foreign address.
  • The cost of training varies widely from school to school. Tuition for the typical formal academic program averages US $6,000-8,000, excluding tools, books, and other expenses.

HOW CAN I BECOME AN FAA DESIGNATED EXAMINER?

FAA examiners are persons designated to act as representatives of the Administrator in examining, inspecting, and testing persons and aircraft for the purpose of issuing airman and airworthiness certificates. They are not employees of the FAA but are either self-employed and charge a fee for their services or work for a private business.

  • Because it must be able to indoctrinate and maintain surveillance of its designated examiners, the FAA designates examiners overseas only if it determines there is a need that cannot be easily met in some other way.
  • In order to be eligible for an appointment a person must meet certain qualifications relating to his or her specialty and hold current FAA certificates.

Title 14, CFR Part 183 describes the requirements for representatives of the Administrator. Part 183 is available from the Government Printing Office (GPO), and it can be found on Internet at http://www.faa.gov/avr/AFS/FARS/far-183.txt.

Types of Examiners

  • Airman Examiner: The Flight Standards District Office with geographic responsibility for your area selects designated pilot examiners (DPE´s) and designated mechanic examiners (DME´s) on an "as needed" basis.
  • Designated Manufacturer Inspection Representative (DMIR): The Manufacturing Inspection District Office of the responsible Aircraft Certification Directorate selects DMIR´s from qualified persons who are recommended by manufacturers under their jurisdiction.
  • Designated Airworthiness Representatives (DAR): The Flight Standards Division of the Flight Standards Regional Office selects maintenance DAR´s from qualified persons recommended by the Flight Standards District Office with geographic responsibility. The Manufacturing Inspection Office or the Manufacturing Inspection District Office of the responsible Aircraft Certification Directorate appoints applicants for manufacturing DAR´s from within its geographic area of responsibility.
  • Designated Engineering Representative (DER): The Aircraft Certification Office with geographic responsibility may select DER´s from qualified persons who apply by a letter accompanied by a "Statement of Qualifications of Designated Engineering Representative."

EMPLOYMENT

The FAA has no jurisdiction over matters related to the employment of foreign nationals in the United States. Information regarding legal requirements for foreign nationals to obtain work permits can be obtained from:

Department of Justice
Immigration and Naturalization Service
Washington, DC 20520
Phone: (202) 514-4330 (automated line)
Website: http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/faq/faq.html

HOW CAN I GET EMPLOYMENT AS A PILOT IN THE UNITED STATES?

Pilot opportunities range widely, from flight instructors at local fixed base operations on small airports, air taxi or charter pilots, corporate flight departments, to large air carrier flight crews. Such opportunities often require communication directly with the air taxi, charter, or corporate headquarters.

Associations such as Aviation Information Resources, Inc., and the National Business Aircraft Association (NBAA) maintain employment referral services for their members. Their addresses are:

Aviation Information Resources, Inc.
4002 Riverdale Court
Atlanta, GA 30337-6018
Phone: (770) 996-5424 or 1-800-247-2777
Fax: (770) 996-5547

Internet URL: http://www.airapps.com

1200 Eighteenth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036

Phone: (202) 783-9000
Fax: (202) 331-8364

Internet URL: http://www.nbaa.org

Airlines often recruit ex-military pilots because they tend to meet desired experience levels. Other pilots are recruited by the airlines from the field of general aviation. The air carrier should be contacted directly for information on these opportunities. Air carrier addresses are available from many sources, such as the World Aviation Director or the Official Airlines Guide. Sources are found in public libraries.

WHAT MUST I DO TO BECOME AN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER IN THE UNITED STATES?

FAA air traffic controllers are required to be citizens of the United States. For further information on aviation career in the United States Government, see "Aviation Careers Series: Government," FAA PA-126-91. It is available free of charge, as long as supplies last, from

Consignment Branch
Superintendent of Documents
8610 Cherry Lane
Laurel, MD 20707

HOW CAN I BECOME A FLIGHT ATTENDANT IN THE UNITED STATES?

Changes in the composition of the air transportation industry in the United States in the last few years have resulted in a backlog of applications for employment at most major U.S. airlines. Many airlines charge "processing" fees in conjunction with applications for such employment. These fees reflect the keen competition which exists for such opportunities.

  • Candidates for flight attendant positions can obtain information regarding applications and procedures from sales or reservations offices of most major air carriers.
  • Normally there is a three or more month delay before the airline will schedule the first of several interviews. Successful completion of the interview process will be followed by physical examination.
  • Airlines generally require four year college degrees though other qualifications and experience are considered. Highly desirable areas of concentration include such people oriented disciplines as psychology, education and medicine.
  • Candidates who speak languages in addition to English, especially Pacific basin languages are particularly sought after.
  • U.S. citizenship is not normally requisite to employment, however, applicants must be able to obtain "traveling" visas for most countries prior to employment.

Additional information about flight attendant careers and opportunities can be obtained from the:

Association of Flight Attendants
1625 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: (202) 328-5400
Fax: (202) 328-5424

or from:

Aviation Information Resources, Inc.
4002 Riverdale Court
Atlanta, GA 30337-6018
Phone: (770) 996-5424 or 1-800-247-2777
Fax: (770) 996-5547

Website: http://www.airapps.com


Top Top
JOFair
Aeronaves en Venta en JOFair.com: Cessna, Piper, Gulfstream, Lear Jet, King Air, Seneca, Bonanza, Saratoga, Baron, Citation, Cherokee, Helicopteros, Aviones.
Click sobre el logo para ir al Home